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20090801
20090831
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English 87
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)
consulting with the government in the battle against terrorism. >> and what we do is we use what legal scholars call predicate based search so we would look at you and then we would go out and say oh there is are lots of different things in your life that may be indicative of someone involved in bad behavior, but it would als alsoe very clear how the government looked at you, it wouldn't be a wide net cast into a sea of data that brings back all of our, all of the innocent citizens that are touched by that net, it would be a very precise, very precise operation and each step in that operation is documented. >> and also from silicon valley the race to produce electric cars we tawld with elon tusk, the ceo of tesla motors. >> we are not paying for the cost of the co2 conzen inflation the ocean and atmosphere and not paying for all of these auxiliary wars and the other things at the gas pumps, you effectively have a sudsy difficult taking place at the gas pump because of that and the only way to bridge that is with innovation. it is to try to make electric cars better, sooner than they wo
, a the siliconvalley mpany nsulting with the government in the battle against terrosm. >> and whawe do ise use what legal scholars call predicate basesearch so we wouldook at you and thewe would goout and say oh tre is are lots of different ings in your life that may b indative of someone involved in bad behavi, but itould als also be very clear how the government looked at you it wouldn't be a wide net cast into a sea of data that bringsback all of our, all of the innocent citizens that are touched by that net, it would be a very precise, very precise operaon and eachtep that operation is documend. >> d also from silicon valley the race to produce electric carse tawld with elon tusk, the ceo of tesla motors. >> we are not paying for the cost of the co2conzen flation the ocean and atmohere andnot paying for allf these auxiliary wars a the other ings at the gasumps, you fectively have a sudsy difficult taking pce at the gapump because of that and the only way to bridge that is th innovation. is to try to makelectric cars better, sooner than they wod otherwise be. >> charlie: arogramming note. my int
the u.s. is it has had very strong ties to each of the political parties. it has, you will find the leaders of all the parties have visited iran. some of them have houses in tehran. there is a lot of links with the kurds, with obviously with the shiites, the iranians, most of them shiites and with the sunnis. so iran is a constant factor and in communication and very much on top of what is going on in iraq. will they influence it disproportionately is what we can't quite tell yet. >> inraq after many long years of casualties and difficulties, there has been some success. and i think it's the goal now ought to be to consolidate that succeed ses and also to use what leverage we have to try toto influence political developments in the right way and that involves arab issue but also involves weighing in if we think there are abuses on the part of the iraqi government and there is some concern that it might be moving in a little bit of a authoritarian direction. >> i think the role we play is a role continuing to encourage iraqis not to use violence, using that term with a lot of lat
of the american enterpre institute. >> one thing iran has done very well guably better than t u.s. isit hasad ry strong ties to each o e politicalarties. it has, u will finthe leaders of all the parties have visited iran. somef them have housesin tehr. there is a lot of linksith the kurds, with obviously with the shiites, the iranians, most of them shiites and with the suns. so iran is aonstant factor and in communicatn and very much on top ofwhat is going on in iraq. wi they influencet' it disproportionatelys what we can quite tell yet. >> in iraq after many long years of casualts and difficulties, there has been some success. and i think it'sthe goal now ought to be to consolidatthat succeed ses and also to use what leverage we haveo try to influence polical developments in the rit way and that involves arab issue but alsonvolves weighi in if we think there are abuses onthe part of t iraqi government and there is some concern tha it might be ving in a littleit of a authoritarian direction. >> i think the rolwe play is a role continng to encourage iqis not to use olence, using that term with a
of soldiers reading us and a lot of mail from them and hear back from a lot of them. >> okay. just saying once in a while, well actually you had pj o'rourke in the '80s. there was a conservative guy. had some great articles. >> i think conservatives like to read us to disagree with us. >> that's right. i, just like with "the new york times", i buy two copies, one to read and one to burn in my backyard after i finish reading it. >> rose: before he broke into television, joe scarborough was a republican congressman from florida from 1994 to 2001. he recently mapped out a comeback strategy not for himself but for the gop. the book is called the last best hope restoring conservatism and america's promise. i am pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> sorry you had to bring me. >> i enjoy hearing the stories about the ball girl last time here. (laughter) >> rose: how are you different today? >> you know, i think -- i think i know now in 2009 what i didn't know in 1995. >> rose: i hope so. >> and ironically, i'm counselling my liberal democratic friends, saying just relax. you know, i tho
horns! of course, that got us splashed all over the newspapers. at a time whenen louis armstrong was on tour in africa, he was banned from south africa because people of african origin who didn't come from south africa could continental come in as endangered servants or migrant laborers. when sidney porirtier came in 1951 they came to south africa as endangered servants of the directors. lieu we armstrong too much influence, but his trumpet came. it made us very famous for most of the year. we appeared in just about every newspaper. then the music community found us and they nurtured us, five of us are still professional musicians today. >> charlie: five from that group. >> yeah.charlie: you stay in touch? >> oh, yeah. we're very good friends. we are all alive. i got meet louis armstrong about six years later when i was in school i went to the grammy awards. and he just said, the one thing you have got never to forget is where you came from. because when i talk, i never finish any sentence without talking about new orleans. >> charlie: new orleans, yes. when you came to the un
reading us d a lot of mail fr them and hear back from a lot of em. >> okay. just sayinonce in a while, well actually youhad pj o'rourkin the '80s there was a conservave guy had some greatrticles. >> ihink coervatives like to read us to disagree wih us. >> that right. just like wi "the new yk times", i buy two copies, one toead and one to burn in my backyardfter i finish reading it. >> rose: before h broke into television, joe scarborgh was a republican cgressman from florida from 1994 to001. he recently mappeout a comeback strateg not for himselbut for the gop. the book iscalled the lt st hope resting coervatism and america'sha amased to have m back at this tle. welce. >> sorry you had to bring e. >> i joy hearing the stories out the ball gi la time here. (laughter) >> rose: w are you differt today? >> you kw, i think -- i think i know now in 2009 what i dn't know in 1995. > rose: i hope so. >> and ironically, i'm counselling my liberal democratic friends, sang just relax. you know, ihought 1995 en we conservatives took over coness, we owned the world. that w could pass atever we want
palestinnian and american institution. the goal is to combin the best of the two-- u.s. and pastinnian education stem. joining me is bar colle president leon bstein. he is the directorf the american symphony chestra. and sari nusseibeh. he is the president of quds university, a ofessor of islamic philosoph i should mtion a book now no paperback which got lots of attention en the hd cover came o called, "once upon a country. a palestinnian life. of it's eat to meet you. >> thank you. >> rose: i've known him for a while. bra whatbrought thisogether? whose idea? what was the eectation? >> well, i think among other things, have beenor six seass the music director of the radio orchestra of israel in z-- gere lem, and i find-- through mutual friends i learned that al qudswas interested in deloping partnerships. this mutual friend, david harm an putsarah andyself together, and someho it exploded into a tee-part program which w this joint degree program for undergraduates. a teacher tining program wch will ope this fall for palestinnian higschool teachers, d a mel high school which we will bu
the degree of progress many of us would have liked. but nevertheless, our concept of cancer as a disease has radically changed. our ability to treat some of the many kinds of cancers has radically altered. >> rose: we continue with freeman dyson on his views on almost everything. >> i enjoy life and i don't particularly care whether what i'm doing at that moment is important. >> rose: it's whether it interests you, is that the test? >> yes. >> rose: is s challenging and interesting to you? >> yes, and science to me is just some, and it's just like-- like painting pictures or anything else. >> rose: two men of science,s can varm and freeman dyson coming up. ptioning sponsored by rose communications captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: harold varmus is here. in 1989, he was awarded the the nobel prize in medicine along with his collaborator jay michael bishop. since 2,000 heeb president of the memorial sloan cancer center here in new yorkrk he was recently appointed co-chair of president barack obama's council vasers on
of putting it on the table. >>. >> rose: the head of kessler motors was scheduled to tell us about his electric car, that interview will take place later. to want, president clinton in north korea, john meacham and general tony zinni when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: bill clinton arrived in pyongyang on an unannounced visit. north korean television is reporting the former president left the country, the jailed journalists with parr were pardoned following an apology in a meter with kim jong il earlier today. the mission comes at a time of heightened tensions between washington and north korea over its nuclear program. as we tape this broadcast at 7:00 p.m., the white house has not commented on the release of the journalists. joining me from washington is glen kessler, diplomatic correspondent for the "washington post" and joe cirincione, president of the plow shares fund, i am pleased to have them both on this program, welcome. >> pleasure to be with you. >> thank you. >> rose: i want you both
of cash. we have great ideas for to you use that cash and they will be quite complex and we look at them say very kind of you but thank you very much. >> and you miss your chance to make a lot of money. >> well i have to say today it being self-satisfied with about it, we can say boring is beautiful. >> andersen, giomatti, and pevene, next captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the global economic crisis has caused us to question many fundamentals. such as what is the nature of our economy? why do we consume so much? is america still a global leader? when you peruse the book shelves and read the op ed pages you see titles like a failure of capitalism. big government ahead. america the tarnished. now comes kurt andersen who examines how we got here and where we go in a new book, reset, how the cries kiss restore our values and renew america. it grew out of a essay he wrote in "time" magazine called the end of excess. i'm pleased to have our friend kurt andersen back at this table. >> you just saw me do a program on ira
many of us would have like but nevertheless, r concept of cancer a a disease has radically changed. our abilitto treat some of the many kinds ofcancers h radilly altered. rose: we continue with freen dyson onis views on most everything. i enjoy life and i don't particular care whether what i'm doing at tt moment i important. >> ros it's whether it interests u, is thathe test? >> yes. >> rose: is it chalnging and interesting you? >> yes, an science to me is justome, and it's just like-- ke painting pictures or anything ee. >> rose: two men of science,s can varm and freeman dys coming up. captioning sponsored by rose communicatis caioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new rk ty, this is charlie rose. >>ose: harold varmus is here. in 1989, he was awarded t the nobel prize in medice along withis collaborator jay michael bishop. since 2,000 heeb presidt of the morial sloan cancer center here in new york. he was recently appointed co-chair of president barack obama's cncil vaser on sciee and tecology. his new book is call"the art and politics of science." heeb is a fri
to a meeting. we were taken to a location and when we walked in through the doors, we saw standing before us president bill clinton. (applause) >> rose: shortly after, president obama spoke outside the white house. >> the reunion that we've all seen on television i think is a source of happiness not only for the families but for the entire country. i want to thank president bill clinton. i had a chance to talk to him for the extraordinary humanitarian effort that resulted in the release of the two journalists. i want to thank vice president al gore who worked tirelessly in order to achieve a positive outcome. >> rose: joining me now is evans revere, president of the new york-based career society. he was among the former u.s. officials involved in the back channel talks that paved the way for the journalists' release. joining me from washington, martha raddatz, senior foreign affairs correspondent at abc news. i am pleased to have both of them. let me first go to martha. the white house, what are they saying so far, mar that are? >> well, the white house is still trying to distance itself wit
. >> i tnk consvatives like to read us to disagree witus. >> that'sight. i, just like withthe new yor times", i buy two copies, one to rd and one to burn in my backyard after i finish readi it. >> rose: befo he broke into television, joe scaorough was a republican congressman from florida from 1994 to 2001. he recently mped out a comeback stregy not for hielf but for the gop. the book is called the last best hope storing conservatism a america promise. am pleased to have him back at th table. lcome. >> sry you had to bring m >> i eny hearing the stories abt the ball girl lastime here. (laughter) >> rose: hoare you differentoday? >> you kno ihink -- i think i know now in 2009 what i did't know in 1995. >rose: i hope so. >> and ironically,'m counselling my liberal democratic friends, sayi just relax. you know, i tought 1995 wh we conservatives took over congrs, we owned the world. that we could pass whever we wanted pass through the house. he senate would confirm it. it would go to t white ouse, be signed ad it would be law and what iound out was james madion was a pretty smart guy. we
now is ens revere, president ofhe new york-based career society. was among the former u.s. officials involved in the back channel talks that paved the way for the journasts' release. joining me from whington, martha rdatz, senior feign affairs corrpondent at abc ne. i am pleased to haveoth of them. let me first go to martha. the white house, what are they sang so far, mar that ar >> well, the ite house is still ying to distance itself with any official kin of trip. they're stilsaying it was a ivate visit, thes after humanitarian mison. but a senior official fm the white houseutlined things that there's clearly heavy white house involvementere, heavy state department involvement here no matter what they call it a lot of this was orchestrated with the help ofhe white house. >> rose: inwhat way did they help? >> wel, they certainly talked toresident clinton. they certainly reached out to esident clinton. the national secury advisor, jim jones,i concted presiden clinton aft al gore contacted t white house and said that e families and that laura ling and euna lee wante president clinn to
george mitchell a number of times and he conferred with us during each time we explained our position and each time he comes to cairo. he visited syria, he visited saudi arabia, other countries. and this is to grasp the issues which is a good thing. it's much better than taking a decision without listening to the country's concern. it might damage these countries, it might as well damage the reputation of and image of the united states. and this is what happened. there was the decision to go to iraq. and that despite the fact there was no mass destruction weapons. and going to afghanistan as well. russia stayed eight years in afghanistan. however, russia did not achieve anything and the russians admitted that fact. there was a gentleman from the russian position came to me and said they stayed with all kinds of weapons for eight years in afghanistan without achieving a thing. so, so, and wait until we see what the americans achieve. and i often repeated that but the u.s. administration was adamant on something decided apriory. >> charlie: do you think that they should get out of afgh
us, senator, thank you for ming and give us sense of where yothink this isheaded anwhat the final version is going to look like. >> well, i suspect that in our group, six members of the financ committee-- the democrats, three remembers-- we're headed ithe direction of a plan that wld cover % of the american people. at would be fullyaid for and that would ben the ct curve in the right w. that is, it would pvent the explosion health care costs that are continug that threatenmerican families, our businesses and en the government itself. >> rose: will there be a public option? well, in our alteative, we have an agement... nothing is reed to unt everything is aged to and everything has not yet beengreed too things could change. but i say the greater likely shood that some sort of public interest cooperative would will likely be e choice. and that is an entity that would provideompetition for the for-prof insurance industry but not be government n and governnt controlled, it wou be controll and run by its mbership. >> rose: and themembership woulbe... who would be in the mbership? peop
scheduled to tell us about his electric car, that interview willake place later. to want, president cnton in north rea, john meaam and general tony zinni when we coinue. captioning spoored by ro communications from our stuos in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: bill clintoarrived in pyongyg on an unannounced visit. north koreantelevision is reporting the forme president left the country, the jailed journalists with parre pardoned followingn apology in a meter wi kim jong il earlier today. the missioncomes at a tim of hehtened tensions between washington and north korea over its nuclear program. as we tape thi broadcast at 7:00 p.m., t white house has nocommented on theelease of the journalis. joining me from washinon is glen kessler, diplomati correspondent r the "washingtopost" and joe rincione, president ofhe plow shares fund, i am pleased have them both onthis ogram, welcome. >> pleasure be with you. >> thank y. >> rose: i wan you both to tell me everything you know about what happened. (laughter) >> what we know is thathis was a carefullarranged agreement put together by
him back on this program. tell us, senator, thank you for coming and give us a sense of where you think this is headed and what the final version is going to look like. >> well, i suspect that in our group, six members of the finance committee-- three democrats, three remembers-- we're headed in the direction of a plan that would cover 95% of the american people. that would be fully paid for and that would bend the cost curve in the right way. that is, it would prevent the explosion of health care costs that are continuing that threaten american families, our businesses and even the government itself. >> rose: will there be a public option? >> well, in our alternative, we have an agreement... nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to and everything has not yet been agreed to so things could change. but i'd say the greater likely shood that some sort of public interest cooperative would will likely be the choice. and that is an entity that would provide competition for the for-profit insurance industry but not be government run and government controlled, it would be contro
to washington in f fe years after cooling in u.s. relations during the bush administration. the trip comes as the obama administration is deeply involved in trying to break a dead locke in middle east peace talks. it wants israel to halt settlement activities and is asking arab leaders to make concessions to move the process forward. the two presidents spoke after the meeting this afternoon. >> ( translated ): we need to move to the final status level and i have contacted the israelis and they said perhaps we can talk about the temporary solution or perhaps a final status, but i told them no, forget about the temporary solution and forget about temporary borders. that's why i came today to talk to president obama and to see that if we move forward on this issue, it will give more hope and more confidence to the people about this issue. >> one of the things that you discover in studying history and being a part of politics is just because something makes sense doesn't mean it happens. and we are going to have to work very hard and ultimately that's going to have to be some courageous leader
was always that he used the rhetoric of bipartisanship to advance, not a far left agenda but a convention family liberal agenda. >> it is up to the president tot allow the in this that are being said that are not true to be taking people away who want to do what he wants us to do. yes, i think the educational task that he still has before him has -- >> he doesn't like confrontation. he believes that you can bring everybody along and you can reconcnce competing interests because he's brilliant enough and because he's talented enough to be able to do it. the reality is that this is not happening. >> charlie: we continue with sir ben kinsley whose new movie is "fifty dead men walking." >> they are really all by chance. then they find themselves on this terrible landscape where one deliberately has to exploit the other and if it doesn't work, drive away. and actually a relationship develops between them where i, my character being, you could -- i suppose could call him a sonless father and his character being a fatherless son. does a very interesting dynamic between them. >> charlie: presid
the attention. we got love, of course, they loved us all the time. >> rose: but there were so many they couldn't give as much as you like. >> so i found out early on that i had to... instead of just staying trouble all the time i had to kind of focus on something so i learned to play the guitar and i learned to love it. >> rose: what would trouble be? boys? >> no, just being too hyper and too... trying to get so mu attention and either aggravation or just being loud and not realizing it. just being just into everything. so learned to discipline myself through my music and then i started writing these songs. then people would come arod and my mother was very impressed with the fact that i could write like that. i could rhyme. >> rose: was it simply because you worked at it so hard or was it a gift? >> it was a gift. the gift ran in the family. i just took it and decided i was going too more. so i would wri all thesese songs when people would come to our house mama would say "run and get your guitar and sing that song you wrote." and then i saw i was getting a lot of attention so i thought "wow
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)